cavetocanvas:

Mickalene Thomas, Portrait of Mnonja, 2010
From the Smithsonian American Art Museum:

Over the last ten years, Mickalene Thomas has become known for large-scale paintings of American women provocatively posed against boldly patterned backgrounds adorned with rhinestones. Her work explores notions of beauty, sexuality and black female identity. Thomas’s use of rhinestones and vivid textile patterns adds an even greater sense of drama and sensuality to her paintings. She is one of many contemporary artists experimenting with non-traditional materials, particularly glitter and sequins. For Thomas, the rhinestones evoke folk art traditions and Haitian voodoo art. They also serve as a metaphor for female beauty products, which can both enhance and mask a woman’s identity.
Thomas’s work stems from her study of art history and the classical genres of portraiture, landscape, and still life, and is inspired by a wide range of sources, fro m Hudson River School landscapes to Henri Matisse’s nudes and Romare Bearden’s collages. Although her paintings often reference the familiar compositional arrangements of odalisque paintings, Thomas imbues her subjects with an agency and action seldom seen in the canon of figurative painting. Portrait of Mnonja is a stunning example of Thomas’s recent work. The reclining figure is posed in a sassy contrapposto and situated against a wood-paneled background redolent of a seventies-era living room. She wears a loose-fitting white blouse with a plunging neckline, and her hair is pulled back in a low bun. Her right hand rests on her knee, revealing nail polish that matches her audacious pink heels. She exudes dignity and self-assurance.

cavetocanvas:

Mickalene Thomas, Portrait of Mnonja, 2010

From the Smithsonian American Art Museum:

Over the last ten years, Mickalene Thomas has become known for large-scale paintings of American women provocatively posed against boldly patterned backgrounds adorned with rhinestones. Her work explores notions of beauty, sexuality and black female identity. Thomas’s use of rhinestones and vivid textile patterns adds an even greater sense of drama and sensuality to her paintings. She is one of many contemporary artists experimenting with non-traditional materials, particularly glitter and sequins. For Thomas, the rhinestones evoke folk art traditions and Haitian voodoo art. They also serve as a metaphor for female beauty products, which can both enhance and mask a woman’s identity.

Thomas’s work stems from her study of art history and the classical genres of portraiture, landscape, and still life, and is inspired by a wide range of sources, fro m Hudson River School landscapes to Henri Matisse’s nudes and Romare Bearden’s collages. Although her paintings often reference the familiar compositional arrangements of odalisque paintings, Thomas imbues her subjects with an agency and action seldom seen in the canon of figurative painting. Portrait of Mnonja is a stunning example of Thomas’s recent work. The reclining figure is posed in a sassy contrapposto and situated against a wood-paneled background redolent of a seventies-era living room. She wears a loose-fitting white blouse with a plunging neckline, and her hair is pulled back in a low bun. Her right hand rests on her knee, revealing nail polish that matches her audacious pink heels. She exudes dignity and self-assurance.

asylum-art:

Beautiful Architectural Watercolors From Maja Wrońska (takmaj)

Artist on tumblr | on deviantART| Facebook | on Behance

Maja Wrońska is a polish artist capable of bewitching people with her incredibly accurate watercolor paintings. Her works of art are magical and go from country to country, catching the right moment on canvas, like a photograph realized in every detail with watercolor.

You can have the sensation of travelling just by looking at her paintings. Through her eyes, you see what particular moment Wrońska wanted to capture and bring back home with her. Switching from one to another, you can find yourself in Paris, sitting on a bench near the Eiffel Tower reading a book as the sky colors itself with yellowish, and then move on to the grey Brooklyn, maybe after having a quick look at colorful Barcelona or gloomy Shanghai.

Wrońska’s art is like a traveler’s suitcase: filled with precious memories from some of the most beautiful cities of the world. Every painting has a particular something, like a tired hawker or a crowd of noisy kids, that brings them alive. It’s really easy to dream with your eyes open when staring at her artwork, for you lose yourself in a trail of wishes.



(via asylum-art)

"My father had taught me to be nice first, because you can always be mean later, but once you’ve been mean to someone, they won’t believe the nice anymore. So be nice, be nice, until it’s time to stop being nice, then destroy them."
- Laurell K. Hamilton
A Stroke of Midnight (via drythroats)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon, via hampton-hunnyy)

fuckyeahchubbyfashion:

fayedaniels:

chubbycartwheels:

The final line to present was Chubby Cartwheels, who served some serious kitschy-chic style. The collection was full of crop tops, leather/pleather skirts, and campy food based prints, such as french fries and doughnuts. There were also lots of sheers and a little bit of leopard. This collection pretty much thumbed it’s nose at every fashion rule in the book, and the results were perfect.”

Loved what they had to say!  Check out the article to see pieces from all the amazing designers at the event!  So much amazing fat fashion!

Congrats Shawna  of Chubby Cartwheels - what a beautiful collection and such an achievement! 

Yessssss!!!

(via hellolittledaisy)

ja-ll:

corivicious:

My fav show

favourite scene of the series

(Source: suqmydiqtbh, via baby-grrrl)

asylum-art:

Julia Fullerton-Batten: In Service

Photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten explores the decadence of the Edwardian era in her new series, “In Service.” Recreating the abusive relationships of the wealthy with their servants, she staged vignettes that depict episodes of exploitation, some of them sexual in nature. “I was fortunate to find three stately homes in the south of England,” she said. “Built in the 18th Century, their interior decorations closely resemble those found in grand houses in the Edwardian era.”

To spell out the class difference, she dressed the servants in authentic butler and maid uniforms, and some of the female employers in Alexander McQueen and Chanel. As in her other work, the high-gloss tableaus continue to blur the line between commercial and art photography.

(via asylum-art)